OREGON HEALTH PLAN CARE COORDINATION

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ALERT

1. Excessive Heat Climate Event for Summer and Mitigation Plan

A heat-related healthcare event or illness can happen in many ways.  Exposure to excessive heat for a prolonged time, underlying risk factors, and many other factors can influence how a heat-related healthcare event happens. The following content will help you understand a few important things about hot-climatic events that occur during the summer. Heat will significantly increase the potential for heat-related illnesses, particularly for those working or participating in outdoor activities. These are specified heat-related illness mitigation methods.

a. Heat Stroke

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

  • High body temperature (103°F or higher)
  • Hot, red, dry, or damp skin
  • Fast, strong pulse
  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Confusion
  • Losing consciousness (passing out)

WHAT TO DO

  • Call 911 right away-heat stroke is a medical emergency
  • Move the person to a cooler place
  • Help lower the person’s temperature with cool cloths or a cool bath
  • Do not give the person anything to drink

Heatstroke is an emergency! Call 9 1 1.

For more information click the link down below

(This link will provide information on readiness for heat-related emergencies and evacuation planning): 

b. Heat Exhaustion

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

  • Heavy sweating
  • Cold, pale, and clammy skin
  • Fast, weak pulse
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Muscle cramps
  • Tiredness or weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Fainting (passing out)

WHAT TO DO

  • Move to a cool place
  • Loosen your clothes
  • Put cool, wet cloths on your body or take a cool bath
  • Sip water
  • Get medical help right away if:
  • You are throwing up
  • Your symptoms get worse
  • Your symptoms last longer than 1 hour

c. Heat Cramps

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

  • Heavy sweating during intense exercise
  • Muscle pain or spasms

WHAT TO DO

  • Stop physical activity and move to a cool place
  • Drink water or a sports drink
  • Wait for cramps to go away before you do any more physical activity
  • Get medical help right away if:
  • Cramps last longer than 1 hour
  • You’re on a low-sodium diet
  • You have heart problems

d. Sunburn

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

  • Painful, red, and warm skin
  • Blisters on the skin

WHAT TO DO

  • Stay out of the sun until your sunburn heals
  • Put cool cloths on sunburned areas or take a cool bath
  • Put moisturizing lotion on sunburned areas
  • Do not break blisters

e. Heat Rash

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

  • Red clusters of small blisters that look like pimples on the skin (usually on the neck, chest, groin, or in elbow creases)

WHAT TO DO

  • Stay in a cool, dry place
  • Keep the rash dry
  • Use powder (like baby powder) to soothe the rash

Generalized Concept (that covers all) and Recommended Actions if the person experiences heat-related illness:

  • Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay out of the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors.
  • High temperatures may result in wildfires and power outages. Be ready for these potential situations.
  • Young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles
    under any circumstances.
  • Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside.
  • When possible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heatstroke.
  • Wear lightweight and loose-fitting clothing when possible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the Occupational  Safety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks in shaded or air-conditioned environments.
  • Anyone overcome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location.
  • Pets can be impacted too! https://www.multcopets.org/news/keeping-your-pets-cool-hot-weather

2. Novel Coronavirus Updates (COVID-19)

To stay up to date on the latest OHA Coronavirus news click here >

To keep informed on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) news click here >

If you have questions about COVID-19 vaccines, Text ORCOVID to 898211, Email to ORCOVID@211info.org, Call 211 or 1-866-698-6155 or visit getvaccinated.oregon.gov for full information.  

In partnership with the Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Department of Human Services, the Oregon Health Plan Care Coordination (OHPCC) program strives to make the health and health care of Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid) members better.

We do this by giving qualified, fee-for-service OHP members medical care management, and a 24-hour Nurse Advice Line.

We‘re here to help – any day, any time.

24/7 Nurse Advice Line
1-800-562-4620
Call ANYTIME you want to talk to a nurse.

Línea de Consejos de Enfermería
1-800-562-4620
Llame a cualquier momento que desee hablar con una enfermera.

Fee-for-service American Indian and Alaska Native members can ask for more care coordination through CareOregon.

Metro: 503-488-2815
Elsewhere: 844-847-9320
TTY: 711

Oregon State IQA

Effective July 1, 2020, Comagine is the Oregon state Independent and Qualified Agent (IQA) and any 1915i questions should be directed to Comagine Health.